Tag Archives: health

How to Temporarily Deactivate Your Social Media Accounts

If you work in the digital marketing or social media business for a living, then you probably became over-stimulated with social media at one time or another. Wanting to take a break from the online world doesn’t have to be black or white where you have to delete all of your content. Instead, learn how to temporarily deactivate your social media accounts and take a social media break!

To get a grasp of how much activity is occurring online at every given second, check out this amazing infographic … makes your head spin, doesn’t it?

Data Never Sleeps 5.0 is the fifth annual version of Domo’s infographic on what happens on the internet in a single minute

A vast majority of the population lives and breathes online material in some form or another. At the same time, it is an acceptable and healthy response to take a break from all of this online activity, as well—something I am currently participating in with my Facebook and personal Instagram.

Why do you need to take a break from social media? Here are a few, scientific-backed reasons that you may relate to, and, if so, you really should consider hitting that ‘Deactivate My Account’ button now!

Why You Should Disconnect from Social Media

  1. Feeling Disconnected
  2. It’s not surprising to discover that people who feel lonely spend much of their time on social networks in an attempt of ridding themselves of that lonely feeling; however, quite the opposite can occur:

    “Both being alone and feeling lonely are on the rise, with an even sharper increase in recent years. We interact face-to-face less; we gather less; we have fewer meaningful connections. Loneliness isn’t just a mental state, either; it has physiological effects, too, such as weakening our immune systems.

    Studies suggest that the “cause and effect” is reversed: People who are already lonely flock to social media. Any way you cut it, these studies generally boil down to the same point: Social media and loneliness are linked.”

  3. Unhealthy Competitive Urges
  4. Receiving likes, positive comments, and shares feels good, but perhaps a little too good. When you start to see a lapse in interactions fon your content yet others are receiving attention for what may be meaningless stuff, it may make your blood boil some.

    “Competition is in almost everyone’s blood, but many of us will fall prey to that drive to get as many likes, followers, etc. as possible — at least more than your friends. The real danger here is that we let it define our worth as human beings, which is obviously a bad thing. No social media post validates who you are as a person; so why do we stress about how many people “like” us?”

  5. Comparing Your Life to Others
  6. We’ve all viewed photos of friends and family where they seemingly have the perfect life: Caribbean vacations, perfect family portraits and get-togethers, success in school and work, etc. How does such broadcasted activity make some of us feel? Pissed off at, not only ourselves due to comparison’s sakes, but at that person, as well. Is it a coincidence? Not really:

    “While you might assume this effect of social comparison only occurs when you browse the pages of people you perceive to be more attractive, successful, etc., the same study found that the more time you spend on social media, the more depressed you can feel while browsing anyone’s page, regardless of whether you perceive them to be better or worse than you.”

  7. Point-Blank Addiction
  8. Constant social media activity can be overwhelming. Learn how to take a break by temporarily deactivating your accounts.Have you subconsciously grabbed your smartphone and typed ‘Facebook’ in your browser without even realizing it? Do you find yourself doing this second-nature action numerous times throughout the day? It may be time for a break!

    “You can absolutely become addicted to social media, and it largely stems from something called FOMO: fear of missing out. People are posting some of the tiniest details of their personal lives online, and we have to see it. The inability to quit social media has even been labeled “social media reversion,” and in a study where people were challenged to stop using Facebook for 99 days, many couldn’t make it past just a few.”

The above list is from the Bustle article, “4 Science-Backed Reasons To Take A Break From Social Media”

How to Temporarily Disable Your Social Media Accounts

Facebook

Locating the ‘deactivate’ button has become more complicated due to Facebook’s constant designs. However, it’s still there despite being tucked away under the ‘Legacy Contact’ option within the account settings:

  1. Click on the account menu button at the top right of Facebook.
  2. Select Settings.
  3. Click ‘General’ in the left column.
  4. Choose Manage your account.
  5. Underneath the Legacy Contact option, you’ll see the section titled, “Deactivate your account.” Click on the link.
  6. Re-enter your password.
  7. You have to choose an option for leaving.
    You must choose one of these reasons as to why you are deactivating your account on Facebook.There’s also the option to ‘Out out of receiving future emails from Facebook,’ which I choose in order to avoid any and all contact from Facebook.
  8. Click the blue deactivate button at the bottom.

Instagram

Instagram’s ability to deactivate an account is way easier and upfront compared to Facebook, but you can’t deactivate your account from the app and have to go through a browser.

  1. Log into instagram.com on a browser either through your smartphone or desktop.
  2. Tap the profile photo in the upper-right corner and select ‘Edit Profile.’
  3. Scroll down and click on ‘Temporarily disable my account’ located in the bottom right.
  4. Select an option as to why you’re disabling your account, and re-enter your password.
  5. Click the button ‘Temporarily Disable Account.’

Twitter

If you deactivate your Twitter account, Twitter will automatically start deleting your account after 30 days.

  1. Sign into your Twitter account through a browser, not through the app.
  2. Go to your Account Settings, and click ‘Deactivate my account’ at the bottom of the page.
  3. Click ‘Okay, fine, deactivate account.’
  4. Re-enter your password.

Snapchat

If you deactivate your Snapchat account, it will be deleted after 30 days.

  1. Visit the delete account page in a web browser.
  2. Login into your account and click continue.

Pinterest

Temporarily deactivating your Pinterest account is also a fairly simple process.

  1. Login to your Pinterest account.
  2. Click your profile button at the top of Pinterest.
  3. On your profile, go to the bolt button.
  4. Click ‘Deactivate Account’ at the bottom of Account Basics.
  5. Select a reason you’re deactivating your account.
  6. Confirm that you want to deactivate it.

LinkedIn

At this time, there isn’t a way to temporarily deactivate your LinkedIn account.

YouTube

There also isn’t a way to temporarily deactivate your YouTube account; however, you can make your YouTube Channel ‘invisible.’

Temporarily deactivating your accounts doesn’t mean you can never return to them, but it allows your mind and emotions a nice break, especially if your online habits are becoming unhealthy and controlling. When you return, try to minimize your use of social media and realize it’s not the real world. Good luck, I’m right there with you!

Benefits of nature for health and creativity.

Why You Need More Nature in Your Life

Benefits of nature and enjoying the great outdoors can help your mental health among other factors.
Image from Fix.com. Click to open full image; expand for better legibility.

The idea that spending time in nature and taking a break from technology increases your well-being shouldn’t be much of a surprise. The benefits of nature are not only great for your health, but allow you to build a different perspective of the world, as well.

A 2014 study at the University of Michigan found that nature walks were associated with significantly lower depression, less perceived stress and enhanced mental well-being.

Research is being conducted in Japan on the physiological effects of shinrin-yoku—also known as “forest bathing,” which means to take a walk in the woods.

According to this 2011 study published in European Journal of Applied Physiology, the benefits of nature “may lower blood pressure by reducing sympathetic nerve activity (reducing urinary noradrenaline levels) and increasing parasympathetic nerve activity. In addition, habitual walking in forest environments may have beneficial effects on blood adiponectin and DHEA-S levels, and habitual walking exercise may have beneficial effects on blood NT-proBNP levels.”

Whenever I have the luxury of being outside, I take in all of the natural colors, types of plant and animal life, and sites that nature has to offer. Living in Colorado, it’s almost second-nature for everyone to be passionate in hiking, camping, etc.

Great Sand Dunes view from backcountry campsite.
The Great Sand Dunes in Mosca, CO, where I backcountry camped and hiked in 2016.

The sand dunes were an amazing place to explore. The colors changed according to the sun’s position—as shown in the above image where the sun was starting to set. This place was captivating where it was so quiet during evening and nighttime that you could perfectly hear your own heartbeat due to the lack of ambient sound as well as a jaw-dropping view of the stars. Not being bombarded with city sounds and getting the chance to see every spec of the Milky Way visible to the human eye are definitely some benefits of nature that I experienced those two nights in the Dunes.

Sunflower center shows the logarithmic spiral occurring natural in nature.
From Jim Wilson at the University of Georgia.

More benefits of nature include seeing how everything comes together in the details. How do colors interact when leaves are changing due to the changing seasons? What shapes form when the wind relentlessly pounds against a rock? When it snows, what shapes are formed by individual snowflakes?

You can find the answer to such questions by taking the time to explore the intricate details of the outdoors and not just the big picture. Time and time again I strive to examine as many things as possible while hiking. Because of this, I observed how balance plays itself out in both symmetrical and asymmetrical ways—similar to best practices and techniques in the design world. After seeing such wonders, I was able to observe the outside world in a completely different point-of-view—along with a newfound respect for nature.

According to this American Scientist article, “Twisted Math and Beautiful Geometry,” mathematical and geometric concepts occur naturally in nature and influence how we see and experience the world around us.

“Of the numerous mathematical curves we encounter in art, geometry, and nature, perhaps none can match the exquisite elegance of the logarithmic spiral. This famous curve appears, with remarkable precision, in the shape of a nautilus shell, in the horns of an antelope, and in the seed arrangements of a sunflower.”

We all need a break from reality once in awhile, so take to the trail, or even your backyard, to discover the benefits of nature for—not only your well-being—but your creativity, as well!

Why You Should Volunteer Your Journalism Skills

This post was published on First Draft, the Society of Professional Journalist’s Generation J’s Committee blog: blogs.spjnetwork.org/genj/2016/09/01/volunteer-journalism-skills/


In a society where both new and seasoned journalists are expected to keep up with the digital revolution and competition, feelings of being overwhelmed are commonplace. How are you expected to land a job if:

  1. You just graduated and don’t have any years (or decades) of professional experience, or
  2. The skills required include either a few or ALL of the following: produce videos, manage social media, write stories and blogs, build graphics, build a rocket ship to the moon, etc.

That’s where volunteering for just a few hours a week can save you in more ways than one.

Volunteering Can Help You With Your Career

If you volunteer, you'll have a 27% higher chance of finding employment than those who don't volunteer.
Image from Non-Profit Quarterly.

According to a Forbes article, “The Corporation for National and Community Service, a federal agency that promotes volunteerism, tracked more than 70,000 jobless people between 2002 and 2012 and found that those who volunteered had a 27% better chance of finding a job than those who didn’t.”

My first journalism-related, volunteer experience was with Citiwide Pre-Vocational Center in Washington, DC, which seeks to improve and foster employment opportunities for low-income families in the metro. I had a quick email and phone interview with the founder and became the Social Media and Website Coordinator from 2012 to 2013. While there, I cleaned the website’s HTML and CSS, managed social networks, and designed a new logo for them.

One of my first logo designs I did for Citiwide Pre-Vocational Center as part of my volunteering experience.

Image above: The logo I created for Citiwide Pre-Vocational Center back in 2013, which was one of the first logos I helped design.

Another experience involved volunteering at Fuzzy Faces Refuge in North Carolina, which provides a sanctuary for common and endangered animal species and works to promote safe interaction with humans. While volunteering, I helped maintain their website and social networks, photography and videography, and even helped market a few events.

Above: Here is a video I quickly produced for one of Fuzzy Faces Refuge’s annual events. This video isn’t perfect, but to visually show and brand this event for the non-profit was worthwhile as they were extremely appreciative and it was fun! (youtu.be/i3VtAIzgSPI)

U.S. News wrote, “5 Ways Volunteering Can Save Your Job Search,” where volunteering can increase your morale, grow your network, upgrade your resume, teach you new skills or improve on existing ones, and even help you choose a career.

Every time I had an interview with a company during or after these experiences, the interviewer would be very interested in my volunteering background. Those experiences became a unique part of my background and helped me land two different jobs after college. Volunteering also helped me increase my network and skills.

Volunteering is Great for Your Physical & Mental Health

Volunteering makes people feel good about themselves because they help without expecting anything in return. People donate their time and efforts to a non-profit whose mission they believe benefits society. According to a post on Harvard’s blog, “Participants who volunteered with some regularity lived longer, but only if their intentions were truly altruistic. In other words, they had to be volunteering to help others—not to make themselves feel better.”

Searching for a job right out of college can be hard and challenging. You may be left with feelings of low self-esteem as well as a fear of the unknown, but volunteering can benefit you! According to a study from the University of Exeter Medical School in England, volunteers have lower levels of depression, enhanced well-being, and are more satisfied with life. There’s also evidence “of an approximately 20 percent reduction in mortality among volunteers compared to non-volunteers.”

Regardless of whether you’re just starting out in your career or are a seasoned journalist, you should consider volunteering your journalistic skills as it will benefit you in some way. I couldn’t wait to help at events or to promote content for the non-profit because I knew I was benefitting their mission while expanding my own skills and network!

If you’re interested in volunteering, I recommend the following sites to get started:

Sources:

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